Possession is nine-tenths of the law

Rob-ford-mayoral

In the Toronto Star this past weekend was an entertaining and in some cases insightful look at the next council members. Each had been asked to attend a photo shoot and bring with them one or two objects that would show the electorate who they were.

The new mayor and several councilors refused to attend or even respond, placing a trivial or perhaps fearful emphasis on the exercise. But this actually for many of those that did rise to the 'challenge' enabled them to show sides of their personal brands that perhaps was not known before.

There were a few that seemed a little contrived in their messages, but others displayed strong symbols of their brands through their passions and values. The full article and link to all the photos are here.

So when it comes to your personal brand, what objects would you choose and why?

Take a moment to add your toonies worth.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

  • Creative idea, Paul! I especially liked the way that our elected officials chose objects in relation to their cultural background, e.g. the tiger.
    It’s interesting how an object possesses multiple meanings in multi-cultural markets. Using the tiger symbol mentioned above, are you portraying protection or aggressiveness as part of your Personal Brand? One of the counselors picked a shovel to illustrate her penchant for building green projects; I doubt she thought of the association some people may have with politicians shoveling manure!
    So, Paul, what are your objects? An ear for listening, an iPhone for communication, or a mirror to reflect people’s voices back to them?
    Sincerely,
    Mike

  • Thanks Mike, too funny re the shovel – or perhaps always digging a hole for themselves! My objects are in my office right now – Innukshuk (I am the guide for you to the right direction, others have safely gone here before), picture of tall mountain (strive to reach your top), family photos (connect to one of my core values).