Step out of your personal brand comfort zone

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While waiting for his owner to return from some local shopping, Bernard here knows where his boundaries are and he is not going to stray at all. If he were to jump out of the back of the truck he would certainly be placing himself in danger. 

Unfortunately, at work, this is something we are all a little guilty of. Perhaps on occasion, assuming it's not going to be life threatening, we need to take a risk or two and leap out of our comfort zone - or maybe just a gentle step will do. 

Three things to step out of your personal brand comfort zone at work;

1. Bring a little more of your personality to work. Choose something from home that you are passionate about or that means a lot to you and add it to your desk, cubicle or office space.  Perhaps a favourite picture, photo or desk ornament. 

2. Consider adding a piece of jewellery or favourite coloured accessory and making it a regular part of your wardrobe. It does not all have to be navy and black. 

3. Identify a skill or strength that you are well known for, that you have a reputation for delivering on consistently and mention it in your outgoing voicemail message. If you pride yourself on returning calls promptly, say so in your voicemail. BUT if you are not good at getting back to people do not date your voicemail either! 

Just my toonies worth - make today a brand you day. 

 

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

  • Good points, Paul. Speaking to point #1 of personalizing your desk, cubicle, or office space, psychologist Samuel Gosling, conducted research on how someone who doesn’t know you can get a more accurate sense of who your are — compared to people who have known you for years — by scanning your house (in this case, a student’s dorm room for 20 min.) for clues to your agreeableness (how helpful and trusting you are), conscientiousness, emotional stability, and your openness to new experiences.
    In “Blink”, Malcolm Gladwell observes that Gosling’s research may also suggest that this could possibly apply to your home. It follows that this could extend to your work space through your expression of your Personal Brand.
    This works on the principle of what Malcolm Gladwell calls “thin-slicing” — the ability of our unconscious to find patterns in situations and behaviours (i.e. Personal Branding) based on very narrow slices of experience (i.e. snap judgements).
    Best,
    Mike
    Mike DeSousa
    Career Mobile Media® specialist
    http://about.me/mikedesousa